Mad Hatters and March Hares

Read  mini-interviews with Ellen Datlow and some of the included authors : Go Down The Rabbit Hole With A Brand New Alice-Inspired Anthology at RT Book Reviews.

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A Q&A about the inspiration for Mad Hatters and March Hares can also be found on Ellen’s webite.

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 Beautifully stitched together, it’s a storybook of strangeness, of oddities and weird concoctions, and I’m confident critics and fans of the original Alice books will fall in love with it.  New adventures await readers in Datlow’s project, as well as new art (book cover included) created by Dave McKean.

I would highly recommend this anthology to any reader passionate about Carroll’s literature. Filled with dark psychological thrillers, hallucinogenic imagery and landscapes, and satirical undertones on the worst of societies habits–Datlow’s book includes stories by eighteen of today’s renowned sci-fi and fantasy authors. Bree Goodchild for Killer Nashville (full review)

 

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For more than 150 years, Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass have entranced readers with their bizarre and imaginative wordplay, surreal settings, and memorable characters. Hugo Award–winning editor Datlow has collected 17 stories and poems inspired by Carroll’s masterpieces. “Gentle Alice” by Kris Dikeman has the battle-worn conqueror of the Red Queen looking for peace. Priya Sharma’s “Mercury” sees Alice and her father sitting in debtor’s prison and trapped by agents of illness and lost hope. In Seanan McGuire’s “Sentence like a Saturday,” a young Cheshire Cat discovers a doorway that takes her into a world unlike her own, in a body not hers, on a search for the door to home. Other contributors include ­Catherynne M. Valente, ­Genevieve Valentine, Jane Yolen, Jeffrey Ford, and more. VERDICT Whether a one-page poem or a short story, these poignant and lyrical selections from well-known names in sf and fantasy highlight new ways to view an enduring classic. Kristi Chadwick for Library Journal. 

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Pop culture has long mined Alice’s adventures for new takes and retellings. The hallucinogenic qualities of Wonderland lend themselves nicely to manipulation and real-world allusions. In this new collection, editor Datlow has collected nearly 20 tales by current science-fiction and fantasy authors, each one bringing his or her own perspective to the bizarre world created by Lewis Carroll. Like Alice’s tale, these new stories blend the familiar and the peculiar: Seanan McGuire asks what it would be like if the Cheshire Cat were suddenly a little girl in “Sentence like a Saturday,” and Ysabeau S. Wilce transforms the Queen of Hearts into an aged star of musicals in “The Queen of Hats.” Playing with form and style as much as with time and characters, the stories in this collection will appeal to all fans of Alice’s world.  Carolyn Ciesla for Booklist Online